The Young Church Needs You to Talk About Sin and Mercy

Teens and adults are being swallowed up and spit out by a secular humanist, morally relativist culture. People have forgotten a fundamental truth about sin: namely, that God did not give Adam and Eve the right to decide what was good and evil (subjective); in His mercy, He gave them the right to choose between good and evil (objective).

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The Joy of Life

One of my absolute favorite movies is Life is Beautiful, starring Roberto Benigni as a humorous, joyful, hopeful husband and father through one of the history’s darkest times, the Holocaust. When I found out that this movie was Saint John Paul II’s favorite movie, it made total sense. The young […]

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Dead.

Our God makes the dead rise. It isn’t an abstract thought or concept. It isn’t a philosophical metaphor. The readings today (1 KGS 17:17-24, GAL 1:11-19, LK 7:11-17) center around one of the defining qualities of God – He breathes life into what was once lifeless. He animates what was still. Our God […]

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Life

Some days I wake up and just wonder, “God, what are you doing?” Each day I am filled with so many different emotions of loving my job, feeling called to work in ministry, and at the same time only wanting to be a wife and mom. In one single moment, […]

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Arise and Shine: John 6:51-58

“Amen, amen, I say to you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you do not have life within you.” I think the disciples and followers of Christ are a bit confused in the Gospel today. They are fixated more on what Christ […]

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Father of Grace: My Story of Abortion, Healing, and Hope

Father’s Day is difficult for me. Not because I had a bad father – quite the opposite. My dad is a former greaser from Chicago, turned nerdy computer analyst and loving parent. He is basically the combination of Danny Zuko from Grease, and Clark Griswold from National Lampoon’s Vacation, only cooler. To […]

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My Father’s Death Changed My Life

On November 19, 2004, my father lost his battle to brain cancer. I remember the tears, the “What now?” moments, and the pain. That’s not all I remember, though; in fact it’s what I remember least.

For the first nine years of my life, I remember the laughs he gave me when I would sit on his lap and he would bounce his leg up and down. I remember coming home from school and seeing the snacks he would make for us waiting on the table. I remember watching TV with him as my mother would leave for work, and watching her return hours later and the two of us still sitting in the exact position we were when she left. Most of all, I remember the love.

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